Thursday, September 10, 2009

MORE E=MAILS AND A QUESTION ANSWERED

Hey,

I am attaching the 1900 Randolph County Census page. The last census Mary Peoples is listed on.


She is living next door to her brother James Mattox.
James Mattox died about 1905, he is buried in the Hill/McClung Cemetery Randolph County.
Their sister Margaret Mattox is also listed on this census she died in Dec-1900 she was also buried in the Hill/McClung Cemetery Randolph County.

Robert Lemond, Mary Mattox's first husband is also buried in the Hill/McClung Cemetery Randolph County.

If I were a betting person I would say Mary Mattox-Lemond-Peoples is also buried in this cemetery. It makes no sense she would have been buried at Union Hill.

Mary Mattox-Lemond-Peoples' daughter Sarah Mattox was sent to the Pauper Farms in Wedowee Randolph County. She died there in 1912. I would bet she was buried in the Pauper Farms Cemetery, since her daughter was living up in Cleburne County AL [about 20 miles away] I doubt they would have known she was dead until days maybe even a week after she died.



Linda









Yep, I was right.

Sarah Mattox/Maddox daughter of Mary Mattox-Lemond-Peoples is not buried at Union Hill she is buried in the Pauper Farms/Poor House Cemetery.


Name: Sarah Maddox
Titles:
Titles & Terms - Prefix(standardized):
Death date: 10 Sep 1911
Death place: Randolph, Alabama
Gender: Female
Race or color (on document): W
Race or color (expanded): White
Age at death: 45y
Estimated birth year: 1866
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Alabama
Marital status: Single
Spouse's name:
Spouse's titles:
Spouse's Titles & Terms - Prefix(standardized):
Father's name:
Father's titles:
Father's Titles & Terms - Prefix(standardized):
Father's birthplace:
Mother's name:
Mother's titles:
Mother's Titles & Terms - Prefix(standardized):
Mother's birthplace:
Occupation:
Street address:
Residence:
Cemetery name: Poor Farm
Burial place:
Burial date:
Funeral home:
Informant's name:
Additional relatives:
Film number: 1894085
Reference number: cn 342
Collection: Alabama Statewide Deaths 1908-1974

Linda

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

E=MAILS I RECIEVED FROM ALABAMA

These are in response to am e=mail I sent to her about the graves in Union Hill Cemetery.
I also asked her about Mary Maddox Peoples.

Hello Cousin

O.K. This is one more mess.

My grandmother maiden name was Maddox/Mattox, she was the daughter of Stephen Whittfield Maddox, son of Permelia Mattox sister to Mary Mattox-Lemond-Peoples

Mary had at least two children out-of-wedlock, one was Sarah born in 1860 she was single but she also had a daughter out-of-wedlock [It is unknown who Sarah's father was] The other child was named Thomas Lindley was your ancestor. As the story goes Thomas Mark Lindley had both Mary Maddox and Elizabeth Ball pregnant. He married Elizabeth Ball and he gave Mary Maddox some land and built her a house for her child. The boys were raised as twins.

Mary later married Robert Lemond [He is buried in the Hill/McClung Cemetery Randolph County.] Later Mary married a man named Peoples [I have no idea where he came from, it is possible he was from Clay County AL.]

Back in the early 1990's some of your direct cousins from CA/TX put up markers for Mary Maddox-Lemond-Peoples, her daughter Sarah Maddox and I think a child by my great grandfather Stephen W. Maddox at Union Hill. I think they got the first husband & the second husband mixed up, because they put up a marker for Robert Peoples. I have tried to find a Robert Peoples/Peeples/Peebles on the census for Alabama & Georgia-There was no one by that name.

As a child I remember going to the cemetery and helping clean the graves off and I remember my family saying those graves were [surname] Hills. I told the Lindleys in CA/TX this but the took the word of Jesse New who was over 100 years old over mine [I think he just told people what they wanted to hear and agreed with them.]

Sarah Maddox died in the Poor House/Pauper Farms around 1915. Unless a family member [Which I doubt] went and picked her body up. Sarah would be buried in the Pauper Farms Cemetery Randolph County.

Sarah's daughter Mary Jane Maddox married James Roberts they are buried at Chulafinnee Cleburne County AL. I would not be shocked if Mary Maddox-Lemond-Peoples went to live with them and is buried up at Chulafinnee in an unmarked grave. If indeed the Peoples man came from Clay County AL. He would be buried there also or Bethel in Clay County about 4 or 5 miles away.

There is also another son James who married Jane Hill-Duffey. They are also buried in the Hill/McClung Cemetery Randolph County.



I have been doing genealogy since 1992 and I cannot find this family in 1850. There is a Mattox man out in OK who spins of Whit Mattox listed above. He has worked on this and done DNA testing with other Mattox males and he and not had much luck either.



My mother was always so embarrassed by Permelia because she had 6 or 7 kids out-of-wedlock and I was too. Until I started working on the cemeteries in Randolph County and I saw she was not alone. There were more bastards being born in Randolph County in the 1860's than in the 1960's.



If you need anything else I can send you my Union Hill genealogy.



Linda

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

THOMAS LINDLEY AND SARAH ANDERSON

As I said before this is very sketchy.This Thomas is the father of Thomas Mark Lindley, my great-great grandfather.
He was born in Laurens Co. South Carolina ca. 1790. He married Sarah Anderson(Betsy) ca. 1810 He died March 24, 1853 and is buried in Moonfield Cemetary, Randolph Co. Alabama.

Thomas served in the War of 1812 as a private in the South Carolina militia in Capt. John Nabors Company. He was honorably discharged and received bounty land in Randolph county, AL. Thomas and his family appears in the 1850 Randolph county, AL census.


Lindley, Thomas
Captain John Nabors Company Militia
Born: 1790
Died: Mar 24, 1853
Buried: Moonfield Cemetery Randolph County
Spouse: Betsy Anderson

Saturday, August 8, 2009

WHEN ELECTRICITY CAME TO OUR HOUSE

The Luther M. Lindley Family
Our family moved to the Gunsight Texas Community in west Texas in the winter of 1929. Our house had no electricity, running water, indoor bath etc. Our house was heated by a large fireplace and a wood cook stove. Our outhouse was 50 yards from the back porch. At that time our family consisted of my Mom and Dad, 7 boys, 2 girls. Our house was 3 miles west of the community school and church. Our property consisted of a farm and ranch land of 640 acres. 150 acres was farm land. The rest was ranch land. We raised cattle, hogs, horses, turkeys and many, many jackrabbits which we ate. We grew our own crops and gardens. Our crops consisted of cotton, sorghum grains, and various garden products. We were poor but never ever went without food. We were lucky and happy.
In the years 1941 & 1942 as WWII came on 6 sons joined the Military Service. About that time the REA (rural electric association) came thru that area of Texas. A REA supervisor came to our house and told our Dad that the REA could only build the lines 1 mile off of the main road which is now US highway 183. He informed our Dad that he would have to pay for the rest of the poles. About 6 or 7 poles because we lived about 1&1/4 miles off the main road. The poles would cost $3.00 dollars each. My Dad told the man we did not need electricity as we were doing just fine with our kerosene lamps and daylight. The man was
Dumb-founded. He insisted that my Dad sign up now or we would be passed by. Our Dad said “no-thanks” again stating that we were doing fine without electricity. The man left and our dad went back to his farming and ranching duties with the help of our sister RosaLee and our brother Billy Gene who was afflicted with sever Epilepsy and our youngest brother Harold who was too young and to be of much help.
And Rosalee and Harold were attending school.
A 2nd supervisor (upper-level) from the REA came to see our Dad about the pole situation. He had heard that our Parents had 6 sons in the Military service at one time and wanted to do what he could to help bring electricity to the farm. Again our Dad told the man he did not need electricity since we had live there all those years without it. The man then stated to our Dad that he had been authorized by the REA to furnish all the poles but the last one, which would be in our yard. And he said it would only cost $3.00 dollars total. Our Dad again said no and the Supervisor left. But 2 days later the Supervisor came back again and said the REA would furnish all the poles now. Our Dad asked him what he could do with the electricity since the house was not wired for electricity? The man was amazed and said he would report this to his high ups? Within 2 weeks all the poles were installed, and then the installers wanted to know where my dad wanted the meter installed? Our Dad told him anywhere he wanted was ok---but our Dad again told them he could not afford to have the house wired. And he would continue to use the kerosene lamps. The REA workers shook their heads and left after installing the meter and running the lines to the house.
Within a few days the same higher up Supervisor came back and told our Dad that he was now authorized to wire the whole house, since our parents had 6 sons in the service of our Country. Our Dad asked the man how much the electricity would cost him per month? The man said $1.00 (dollar) per month. Our Dad argued with the man and said he and our Mother would not use the Electricity. Again the man left dumbfounded.
By the time the electricity was turned on, our brother Ben had been sending our Parents a soldier’s allotment each month, about $30.00 dollars per month. Although the other 5 brothers tried to send the money, the military would only allow 1 allotment per family. This $30.00 dollars came in handy for our parents as our parents income was cut way back with only our dad left to do all the farming and ranching.





When the 1st electricity bill came in it was $1.03 total. Our dad took the bill to the REA office in Breckenridge, Texas and complained to the clerk about the $.03 excess charge. Our Dad stated that they seldom used the electricity and only used it when they had company to run the lights. This clerk knew our family real well and about the 6 sons in the Military. She waived the $.03 and it was a long time before the minimum was ever exceeded again. Only when all 6 Brother’s came home from WWII did the lights stay on after dark. We celebrated into the night when the last brother came home from the service in the Good Old days.



CARL E. LINDLEY

Thursday, July 30, 2009

WHERE DID OUR NA,ME COME FROM?

The name Lindley comes from the old English for a clearing in the midst of lime trees, Lind - meaning lime tree and Ley - meaning clearing. The place name Lindley occurs at least four times in the West Riding of Yorkshire, Old Lindley and Nether Lindley ( between Elland and Huddersfield), Lindley in the ancient parish of Otley and Lindley in Healingly a lost locality. There are at least two distinct surnames derived from these and they cannot always be kept apart. What follows is an account of the Otley family drawn from various sources. The Lindley's took their name from the hamlet of Lindley near the township of Otley now represented by Lindley Hall, a substantial farm on the northern side of the reservoir of the Washburn Valley.
Lindley was one of the small hamlets of the Liberty of Otley which came into being in 937 AD by a grant to the Archbishop of York by King Athelstan after the battle of Brunanburgh The Liberty was cantered around Otley, the market town with church, court house, pinfold the Archbishops Hall and chapel.
The custom of identifying a person by his place of origin seems to have started in the Saxon times but did not become common until Norman times and in many cases much later. Early references to the surname may be unrelated individuals, many occur in undated deeds, but it is fair to assume that the Lindley name was an hereditary surname from the 1200's.
The first Lindley to appear in writing was a Sivard and Thomas de Lindele in the York Assize Court Rolls in 1204. Folcasuis, known as Falk appears in the Extent of Otley in 1307, his son William was in Otley in 1292.
In the 1200's a certain Edard or Udart de Lindley was farming the land around Lindley Hall, his grandson William de Lindley was betrothed to Alice Fulk of Wakefield. Alice was well connected as her father known as Fulk the Butler was a manservant to the Archbishop of York, as a result of his connections to the Archbishop Fulk was enabled to buy half the Manor of Farnley as a wedding present for Alice and son-in-law William de Lindley and as a result of this it marked the rise to prominence of the Lindley's who throughout the middle ages were to become an important family in Yorkshire.
Sometime in the 12th century the Lindley's moved to the next township of Leathley when the township became part of the Forest of Knaresborough but returned to Lindley after the signing of the Magna Carta.
A Robert de Lindeley was at Lindley in 1378 and is described as an Armiger, a William de Lindley became Lord of Farnley a township to the east in about 1230, the Lindley's continued as Lords of the Manor of Leathley until the 1524 period when Isobel the sole heiress of Thomas Lindley of Lindley married Brian Palmes of a York family. During this time the Lindley's became established at Otley and are named in many records.
Sometime during the 15th century a branch of the family became established at Leathley and at Skutterskelf in Cleveland, this is shown in the Will of Thomas Lindley gent., in which he mentions his son and heir Percival and William Lindley of Leathley, amongst his possessions he mentions "My suit of armour in the tower at Hexham". In a footnote of the extract of the will there is a reference to Skutterskelf and the Gower family, So now we have an ancient family land owning and with some influence in three locations, Lindley, Leathley and Skutterskelf in Cleveland.

Friday, June 5, 2009

PHOTOS FROM THE PAST COURTESY OF UNCLE CARL

Here are some great photos from Uncle Carl. If you see a photo in the slideshow that you'd like to view in greater detail (or save a copy) just click it. You'll be taken to Picasa album where you can zoom in on photos, save them, or email them to others.

Enjoy!

Tuesday, June 2, 2009

Reunion was a Blast!

Here are some photos from this year's reunion. It was goodtimes all around...

Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Here It Comes... The 2009 Luther Lindley Family Reunion!

As May approaches, many Lindleys' thoughts begin to turn to... Possum Kingdom Lake.

The reunion is fast approaching, scheduled for May 22nd-25th this year. We're back at the Lakeshore Marina, and all the details can be found in this year's 2009 Luther Lindley Family Reunion Family Newsletter.

To read the newsletter, just click the link above. Copies have been sent to all the email addresses my Dad and I have on file, and if you submitted a regular mailing address at one of the previous reunion meetings you should be receiving a copy in your real mailbox.

Leave a comment if you have any questions, and we can't wait to see everyone again this year!

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

THOMAS LINDLEY AND ELIZABETH HALL

AT THIS POINT IN HISTORY THE BIOS GET PRETTY SKETCHY AND PRONE TO MISTAKES, OUR FOREFATHERS WERE MOVING WEST SO FAST THAT THEY DID OT HAVE FORMAL EDUCATION BECAUSE THERE WERE NO TEACHERS. SOME OF THEM DID NOT EVEN KNOW HOW TO SIGN THEIR NAME.



THOMAS7 LINDLEY (JAMES6, THOMAS5, JAMES4, JAMES WILLIAM3, JOHN ISAAC2, JOHN1) was born 1754 in
North Carolina, and died 1809 in Laurens Co. S.C.. He married (1) ELIZABETH HALL, daughter of AQUILLA
HALL and SOPHIA WHITE. She was born Bet. 1745 - 1769, and died Abt. 1802. He married (2) ELIZABETH
RIDGEWAY.
Notes for THOMAS LINDLEY:
They are buried in the Lebanon Methodist Church cemetery near Rabun's Creek in Laurens county, SC. The
cemetery has a memorial list of soldiers who fought in the Revolutionary War that contains the name of Thomas
Lindley. It is not known if his wife Elizabeth is buried there. Beginning with this generation this line of the family
had changed over to the American side in the Revolutionary War.
This marker represents the battle of September, 1781, which took place at Quaker Thomas Lindley's mill, where
over 250 soldiers on both sides were killed or wounded.
At this site patriot militia commanded by Brigadier General John Butler ambushed loyalist militia commanded by
Col. David Fanning in an effort to free Gov. Thomas Burke and other patriot prisoners whom the loyalist had
captured at Hillsborough the previous day. Although losses were heavy on both sides, the loyalist kept their
prisoners and continued their march to join the British forces at Wilmington. After the four hour battle, local
residents cared for the wounded on both sides and buried the dead."
Will Typescript Abstract of Thomas LINDLEY, of Laurens County, South Carolina.
"Lindley, Thomas. Sons: James, William 5 Youngest, viz: Thomas, Aquilla, John, Johnathan, Henry...daus:
Elizabeth, Hannah, Sarah, Mary [Ruth] Abercrombie, Nancy Bolt...Exer: Wife, Elizabeth; sons, James and
William...18 Oct 1808...Prd 6 Jan 1810...Bk D-1, P. 5. Wit: Charles SMITH, Colvil & John ABERCROMBIE."
Source Citation and Source Information:
South Carolinians in the Revolution: With Service Records and Miscellaneoud Data, Also Abstracts of Wills,
Laurens Cty (96 District) 1775-1855 by Sarah Sullivan Ervin. Clearfield Publishing Company, 1949. Reprinted
with an Index and an Added Chapter on the Sullivan Family. Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc. Baltimore,
MD 1976. 2003. Library of Congress: 65-24109; ISBN: 0-8063-0104-X.
More About ELIZABETH HALL:
Burial: Laurens Co. S.C.
Children of THOMAS LINDLEY and ELIZABETH HALL are:
2. i. THOMAS8 LINDLEY, b. 1790, Laurens Co. S.C.; d. March 24, 1853, Randolph Co. Alabama.
3. ii. AQUILLA LINDLEY, b. 1791.
iii. JOHN LINDLEY.
iv. HENRY LINDLEY.
v. ELIZABETH LINDLEY.
vi. HANNAH LINDLEY.
vii. SARAH LINDLEY.
viii. JAMES LINDLEY.
ix. WILLIAM LINDLEY.
x. MARY LINDLEY.
xi. NANCY LINDLEY.

Tuesday, March 10, 2009

COUSIN DENISE SENT THIS TO ME IN AN EMAIL

Relay For Life


This past year my family lost our dear Uncle Ben. My uncle bravely battled bone cancer - although it appears that his heart is what gave up the battle he fought just as he fought in WWII. My Mom Imogene has battled and won over breast cancer not once but twice. My Dad, my daughter Melissa and I battle skin cancer.

This year, hundreds of thousands of people will hear the words "You have cancer", and there's a good chance that some of them will be people we know and love. We have all been touched by cancer in some way ... and we all have the power to make a difference.

That's why I have chosen to fight back right here in my own community by participating in the American Cancer Society Relay For Life®. I want to invite you to join me in the fight against cancer by making a donation in support of my efforts. Further down in this message is a link to my personal Relay For Life® web page where you can make an online contribution. Every amount, no matter how small, makes a difference and provides hope. You can also sign up to join my team and learn more about Relay and how it's changing lives.

Relay For Life® brings more than 3.5 million people from across the country together each year to celebrate the lives of those who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost, and fight back against a disease that takes too much. This fun-filled, overnight event empowers everyone to help fight cancer by raising money and awareness to support the American Cancer Society's lifesaving mission.

Thank you in advance for your support. Together, we will celebrate, remember, and fight back. For state fundraising notices and the American Cancer Society's Privacy Policy, please paste the following link into your browser: http://www.cancer.org/docroot/SU/su_0.asp.

Click here to visit my personal page.
If the text above does not appear as a clickable link, you can visit the web address:
http://main.acsevents.org/site/TR/RelayForLife/RFLFY09PL?px=9728755&pg=personal&fr_id=17045&fl=en_US&s_tafId=285828

Click here to view the team page for M*A*S*H
If the text above does not appear as a clickable link, you can visit the web address:
http://main.acsevents.org/site/TR/RelayForLife/RFLFY09PL?team_id=451410&pg=team&fr_id=17045&fl=en_US&s_tafId=285828



View Message My Profile Add to Address Book Forward To A Friend Privacy Policy State Fundraising Notices Unsubscribe

All content and works posted on this website are owned and copyrighted by the
American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. 2008 - 2009 ©

Friday, March 6, 2009

JAMES SON OF THOMAS LINDLEY & ELENOR PARKE

THE SECOND IN LINE WAS THOMAS (READ HIS BIO THAT I POSTED ON 1/31/2009)

THE THIRD OF OUR LINE IS JAMES

James was a captain under Colonel David Fanning in the Revolutionary War and fought in various battles at Fort Ninety Six in SC. James was an active Loyalist. (Loyal to the British) Visit this fort in SC and imagine your ancestor there fighting for the cause he believed in.

BROTHER OF JOHN - JAMES LINDLEY OF RABERN’S CREEK IN 1775 WAS A CAPTAIN OF THE UPPER SALUDA REGIMENT OF THE SOUTH CAROLINA PROVINCIAL MILITIA. HE WAS RECRUITED BY COL. JOHN BOYD AND HIS COMPANY PARTICIPATED WITH A TORY FORCE THAT MARCHED INTO THE GEORGIA BACK-COUNTRY. THERE THEY WERE SURPRISED AND DEFEATED AT THE BATTLE OF KETTLE CREEK IN WILKES COUNTY, GA ON 2/14/1779. LINDLEY AND 4 OTHER TORY LEADERS WERE SUBSEQUENTLY TRIED IN SOUTH CAROLINA AND HANGED FOR TREASON BY THE WHIG FORCES

James Lindley, Tory

James Lindley, son of Thomas Lindley, (son of James Lindley and Eleanor Parke) and Ruth Hadley was born 22 Sept 1735 London Grove, Chester County, Pa. and married Mary Cox in Kennett, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He is named in the will of his grandfather, Simon Hadley, who left will in New Castle County, Delaware and names all his grandchildren. He is named in the will of his father, Thomas Lindley, of Lindley's Mill, Orange County, N.C. Bk. A, p.22 who mentions Thomas Lindley, son of James Lindley, Sr., dec'd (will dated 15 March 1780 Aug. Ct.1782.

James Lindley married in 5-5- 1753 Mary Cox, the daughter of William Cox of Cox's Mill and Catherine Kanky/Kenky of the present Randolph County, N.C. James came to Orange County, N.C. by 1753-55 and had several land transactions. (Orange County, N.C. Deeds.) An article by Lindley Butler states he had 1170 acres in Granville Grants in Orange County (Now Chatham County) on Terrel's Creek. From 1753 to 1766 he is mentioned in the county court minutes, and he was licensed to keep an ordinary in his home.

Deed Records in S.C. show he was there by 1767 when Peter Allen had 100 acres in Berkley County on a small branch of Reedy River, called the Reedy fork, bounded by vacant land. Survey cert. 9-367 granted 7-15 1768 Rec. 9-28-1768 James Lindley for the memorialist, Jno Caldwell, D.S. Butler states he acquired 200 acres in 1768 and another 200 in 1773.

On the 4-28-1768, Lindley was named as having land bounding W on Charles Quails received on a branch of Raybournes Creek which was also bounded by George Hollingsworth, S.E. on John Williams, w on JL granted 4-28-1768 Re. 9-30-1768, Ralph Humphrey-for the memoralist, Quit Rent begins in two years.

On the 21st August 1769 and rec. 1 May 1790, Jno. Box., planter sold Francis Moore, both of Berkley Co., S.C. 150 acres in Berkley Co. Probate made by Magneese Good 30 April 1769 before James Lindly, one of his majesty's justices to keep the peace. On 2 Dec. 1768 he was commissioned a crown Justice-of -the-peace for Granville County, and until the Revolution, he held crown commissions for Craven county, Ninety-Six District, and the Cheraws district. The State General Assembly appointed him a justice for Ninety-Six District in 1776, but Butler states that considering his loyalist sympathies, it is unlikely that he served the revolutionary government..

On 7&8 Sept 1772, James Lindley of Craven County, Esqr, and Mary, his wife, to John Williams merchant of same for 112 lbs. SC money land granted 12 Sept 1768 to Robert Briggs, on a branch of Rabins Creek adj. land of John Turk. Said Robert Briggs did convey to Ralph Humphries and said Ralph sold to James Linley, Esqr. 31 Jan. 1772. James Lindley (LS) Mary Lindley (LS) Wit: Thos Cohune, Randal Hennesley, Rec. 15 Jan.1774.

On 15 Sept 1775, James Lindley, Esq, J.P., Lewis Dutarque, and John Boyd, witnessed deed of Ralph Humphreys Surveyor of Craven Co., Province of S.C. to John Williams planter for 300 lbs 100 ac on Durbin's Creek originally granted 15 July 1768 to John Humphreys & conveyed to Ralph Humphreys bounded on John Boyd's land (Laurens Co., Deeds).

Notice his land bounded John Boyd which was also the name of the Tory leader of the Battle of Kettle Creek.

Lindley was a captain in the Upper Saluda Regiment of the provincial militia. In 1775 a majority of the South Carolina back county settlers were loyal to the crown and were forcibly subdued by the Revolutionary forces under Charleston leadership. The regiment was mustered by the commanding officer in 1775, Colonel Thomas Fletchall of Fair Forest, for the purpose of determining the regiment's loyalty which unanimously supported the crown. None other than David Fanning, who later became a noted loyalist leader and led the Tories at Lindley's Mill in N.C., was a sergeant in Captain Lindley's company. In Fanning's Narrative, recorded in the North Carolina State records, he writes,"' the first day Of May, (1775), Capt James Lindley of Rabern's Creek, sent to me as I was a Sergeant of the said company, to have his company warned to meet at his house 15 of said month. I did accordingly, and presented two papers; there were 118 men signed in favour of the King, also declared to defend the same , at the risk of lives and property, in July 1775."

In November, civil strife began between the Whigs and Loyalists. Major Joseph Robinson, now commander of the Upper Saluda regiment defeated a Whig force force at Ninety-six on November 19-20 of 1775. A fort known as Lindley's fort, which the property was taken over by the Patriots in 1775 was used as a stronghold against Indian and Tory attacks. The Whig Militia with help from the North Carolina Militia cornered the heavily outnumbered Loyalists under Patrick Cunningham at the Great Cane Brake on December 22. Captain Lindley was among 130 Tory prisoners captured at this skirmish and sent to Charleston where they were soon released. On July 15 1776 a Loyalist-Cherokee party attacked Lindley's Fort in which the inhabitants along the Saluda and Rabun had taken refuge About 88 Indians and 102 white men painted and dressed as Indians made the attack. Major Jonathan Downs with about 150 men arrived the night before and and drove off the attackers. It is not known whether Lindley was there. After several hours they withdrew. James Lindley remained an active loyalist until his capture at The Battle of Kettle Creek. A letter from Governor John Rutledge dated Aug 30 1777 refers to Lindley participating in a raid and escaping capture.

Colonel John Boyd marched into the Georgia backcountry early in 1779 with a group of 600 loyalists to cooperate with the British invasion there. On 14 February 1779 at Kettle Creek in Wilkes County, Georgia, they were surprised and defeated by the Whigs commanded by Colonels Andrew Pickens, John Dooley and Elijah Clarke. James Lindley, John Anderson, Aquilla Hall, Samuel Clegg and Charles Draper were five, among those captured, who were fined 86.4.0 each and sentenced to hang. Also tried at a a special court held February 22 1779 were others, including George Hollingsworth and William Lindley, probably the son of James. Also the names of William Cunningham (Bloody Bill) and James Cunningham, all probably neighbors of Lindley. The Sheriff of Ninety-Sixth District compiled a list as part of his claim for money owed to him by S.C. State Government Audited Accounts # 5335.

"To the gaol fees on commitment of Las Linley, John Anderson, Aquilla Hall Sm. Clegg and Charles Draper who were hanged &c …L 86 : 4: 0 each"

In Laurens County, South Carolina Wills, p. 3, Will A Estate Records, p. 16-17: An account of the appraisement of the estate of Jas. Lindley , Dec. 200 acres at 60 lbs. , 100 acres at 30 lbs. Jas. Abercrombie, George Hollingsworth, Thos. Cunningham, sold 12 Jan 1790. Thomas Lindley.

P. 28-33 Feb 1801 Administration of estate of James Lindley, dec. List of debts for Dec 1777, & Jan. 1778. Joesph Briton, proven before John Rodgers 1795 Thos Lindley, Adm. ( The S.C. Archives have informed me that the above documents are not extant.)

14 May 1785-Sept 1786 Thomas Lindley, The eldest son of James Lindley of Raborn Creek settlement and his wife, Elizabeth sold to Marmaduke Pinson for 20 shillings 100 acres lying in Craven Co., now called 96 Dist., on a small branch of Reighbon's Creek and bounded on SW by land of George Hollingsworth, on SE by land of John Williams, W. by James Lindley and all other sides vacant. Original grant to Charles Quail bearing date 16 June 1768 and conveyed by him to Ralph Humphreys who conveyed to James Lindley, father of Thomas Lindley 12 Dec. 1768. Wit: Richard Pugh, John Mitchel, Joseph Pinson.

This deed above combined with the information of Rebecca Lindley Smith, wife of Revolutionary Soldier, David Smith, who married in Abbeville County, South Carolina in 1782, and who lived in Pendleton District, S.C. for a number of years, migrating to Jackson County, then Walton County, Georgia ca. 1807 proves her father was James Lindley. Rebecca made application for a widow's pension in 1855. In it were a number of depositions given by relatives, several of whom were of the Lindley family. She never mentions that her father was a loyalist, but that he died during the Revolutionary War.

Rebecca Smith, widow of David Smith, made application for a Revolutionary Widow War Pension in 1855. Several depositions are made. One is made by Jonathan Lindley who stated he was her brother and knew of her marriage to Smith and had lived with them. A William Lindley stated he was the son of her brother, Thomas, and Mary Abercrombie, wife of Colville Abercrombie, stated she was her sister and had been present at her wedding, and a Reverend Downs had married them in 1782.

Thomas Lindley, son of James died in Lauren's County, S. C. ca. 1810. He named son, William, and also daughter, Nancy Bolt who had also testified she was a "distant relative" of Rebecca. The will of Thomas Lindley of Laurens County names son, William and Nancy Bolt as daughter and Colville Abercrombie is a witness or appraiser to his will. Jonathan Lindley who said he was a brother of Rebecca's, married Ruth Blair, and their daughter married Job Smith, born 1791 son of Benjamin Smith, of whom it is stated was a brother of David, and who also married Ruth Lindley, another daughter of James and Mary Lindley There is a deed in Pendleton District, S.C. Book I where David Smith sold Jonathan Lindley land.

Lindley Butler's article on James Lindley names as the children of James and Mary Cox::

i. Thomas m. 1. Elizabeth Hall 2. Elizabeth Ridgeway. Served in the Revolution as a Whig; left will in Laurens County, S.C. 1809; sold land as eldest son of James Lindley of Raborn Creek Settlement to Marmaduke Pinson 1790.

ii. William said by Butler to have moved back to North Carolina and settled in Chatham Co. by 1774. He was recruited with father by Col. Boyd in 1779 and was captured in the Battle of Kettle Creek. Although imprisoned at Ninety-Six and tried for treason, he was released before the execution of his father. He returned to North Carolina and was commissioned 16 July by Col. David Fanning as captain in the Chatham Count Loyalist Militia. He is the William Lindley who was murdered by three Loyalist deserters in Jan. 1782. Fanning reported that Lindley was "cut to Pieces with their Swords," and Fanning personally tracked down two of the three men and hanged them. He has been confused with Thomas Lindley's son, William, in other Lindley works;, but a check of the dates of the will of William , son of Thomas confirms that this incident happened before the will.

iii. John Lindley -probably the John Lindley who d. in S.C. ca 1821.

iv. Johnathan Lindley married Ruth Blair, moved to Georgia with the Smiths; lived for a while in Walton County, Georgia then moved to Cobb County, Ga.

v. Ruth Lindley m. Benjamin Smith, brother of David Smith. They remained in S.C. where Benjamin left a will . For a time he must have been in Georgia, and descendants to Georgia later.

vi. Catherine Lindley m. Abraham Box.

vii. Sarah Rebecca Lindley m. Revolutionary War soldier, David Smith, in Abbeville County, South Carolina 1782/3. See above

viii. Mary Lindley Abercrombie m. Colville Abercrombie; was still living in S.C. when she made deposition in 1855 that she was at wedding of her sister, Rebecca and David Smith.

The Lauren's county Historical Society did erect a marker at the site of Lindley's Fort which is located on a knoll one and 1/2 miles northeast of the junction of Dirty Creek and Rabun creek, but it was either vandalized or blown away. An article dated December 4, 1978 in the Laurens County Advertiser stated that it had been added to the national Register of Historic Places and a permanent marker was to be placed; the site now is part of a cattle ranch. Submitted by Mary Lee Barnes 6525 Deane Hill Dr #20 Knoxville, Tn. 37919. End Notes and References

1. Lindley Butler, "James Lindley," article from Laurens County Library, Laurens Co., S.C.

2. Revolutionary Pension of Rebecca Smith in Walton County, Ga. and affidavits accompanying it. (Courtesy of Bernice Spier, descendant)

3. Laurens County Deed and Will Records

4. Dan Branyon, The Laurens County Advertizer, December 4, 1972, "Fort Lindley, One of County's Least Known about Landmarks."

5. McCall, The History of Georgia, p. 399.

6. Robert S.Davis, p. 206, Georgia Citizens and Soldiers of the American Revolution.

7. Reverend Silas E. Lucas, Some South Carolina County Records, Vol. 2, P. 201, 1989

8. Mary Bondurant, Citizens & Immigrants, p. 219, 227, 207.

9. Letter from Robert Lindley, descendant of Thomas Lindley, (James, Thomas )

10. Narrative of COL'O DAVID FANNING Written by Himself, Detailing Astonishing Events in No. Ca. From 1775-1783, North Carolina State Records, Vol. XXII Miscellaneous, pp. 180-239.

11. Brent H. Holcomb, South Carolina Deed Abstracts 1773-1778, p.34, SCMAR South Carolina, 1993

12. Unfinished letter addressed to Mr. Goss, writer unknown, sent by Bernice Spier, Ft. Walton Beach, Florida.

13. Will of William Cox,1766.Orange County, N. C.

14. Note: Although I state in first paragraph that James and Mary were married in Pennsylvania, I do not have proof , and Lindley Butler states they were married in Orange Co., N. C I have found a record where William Cox was there by September 1753.

From Eli Whaley of Walton County Georgia Family History and Related Families of Grace, Smith, Lindley, and Cox.

By Mary Lee Barnes

----------------------------------------------------------

Lindley's Fort

The Laurens County Advertiser December 4, 1979
Revolutionary War Outpost………... Fort One of County's least -known -about landmarks By Dan Branyon

One of Laurens County's oldest yet least known about landmarks has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places, located west of Laurens near Rabun Creek, was a Revolutionary War period outpost . Notification of its listing was given by the Department of the Interior last month to the South Carolina Department of Archives and history the register program in the state. Following the Revolutionary War, the fort fell into ruins and its location was forgotten for almost a century. Then in the fall of 1973, Hickory Tavern business man and historian Roy Christie was reading a periodical which mentioned a Lindley's Fort located in Laurens County.

The article aroused Christie's curiosity and he set out to find the site. His search took him to Sara Nash, a retired history teacher who had a tattered old Laurens County (Kyzer-Helliams map) "was a sort of like a Chamber of Commerce thing, he noted It featured the minerals in the ground , the ----- the rivers, the type of things needed to draw industries and mills into the area"

Christi continued his search , returning to the Nash home time and time again to re-examine the map for identifiable points. He questioned the longtime residents of the area but had a hard time finding anyone who knew anything of the Fort (sentence blurred) believed to be the location in early 1975 , the history buff found someone who could verify his finding He met J. W. Tinsley who in his boyhood had lived nearby and played at the site. Now in his 80's , Tinsley recalled finding old coins and artifacts as he played there with friends.

Richard Carrillo , an archaeologist from the University of South Carolina was then called in to inspect the site. He analyzed the documentary available and also visited the site. The archaeologist agreed with Christie , the location of Lindley's Fort was not longer a mystery.

According to Christie, "the fort was one of a number of fortified-type plantation homes in the area. " A whole string of boundary forts ran in Greenville County," he explained. In those days, the Laurens County-Greenville county line served as border between the settlers and Cherokee Indian Nation. Whenever there was an Indian uprising, settlers would leave their home and take shelter in the fort"

When was the fort built / Christie said records from 1776 refer to it as an "old fort: therefore , It likely it served as place of Defense in the colonial times that preceded the Revolution.

It was probably built to meet the needs such as that of Feb. 8, 1761 , when it was reported that 27 persons on Rabun Creek had been killed in an Indian uprising. The property of Lindley, a Loyalist, the fort was taken over by the Patriots in 1775 for use as a defensive stronghold against Tory and Indian attack. One year later, it was to the site of a famous battle.

In July of 1776 , an Indian attack was expected and the inhabitants along the Saluda river and Rabun Creek took refuge in the fortress. About 1 A. M. on July 15, they were stormed by 88 Indians and 102 white men, many of whom were painted and dressed as Indians.

What the attackers did not know was that Major Jonathan Downs, along with 150 men , had arrived at the fort the previous evening. A fierce battle ensued, but the fire of rifles and musketry proved too much for the aggressors.

By daylight was .(sentence omitted in copy.) the garrison immediately pursued and captured 12 of the white attackers. They were transported to Ninety Six for imprisonment.

Today the fort site if part of a cattle ranch owned by Raymond Williams of Mountville. Located on a knoll one and one half miles northeast of Dirty Creek and Rabun Creek, the site looks a lot different than it did 200 years ago.

A slight indentation around the top of the knoll marks where the trench in the which the stakes for the stockade were placed upright. Piles of stone in the area mark where the fort's corners once stood

The archaeologist who inspected the finding discovered a hole in the ground which either a root cellar or a powder magazine. And three evenly spaced stones there could mark the graves of three Cherokee chiefs killed in the skirmish.

Christie said there are no plans to reconstruct the Fort at the time. The Laurens County Historical Society did erect a marker there in 1976, but either the wind or vandals did away with it , since Lindley's Fort has been added to the National Register, a permanent marker will be erected soon..

A picture of Mr. Christie in front of the marker is shown as well as an artists conception of the fort. MLB

-----
David Smith & Rebecca Lindley

David Smith, Revolutionary War Soldier of Abbeville , Long Cane area of Old Ninety Six District South Carolina , born between 1753 and 1755 ; died 27 March 1833 at his home in Walton County Georgia where he is buried in the Smith Family Cemetery at his farm on Hog Mountain Road Route 53 near Winder, Walton County now Barrow County Georgia. David Smith married in March 1782 Rebecca Lindley, born 9 August 1762, in Ninety Six district, South Carolina. She was the daughter of James and Mary Cox Lindley. James Lindley was a Tory who was hanged in Pendleton District after being caught by the Whigs in Georgia at the Battle of Kettle Creek.

Before the Revolutionary War, he lived in the area of Ninety six District which later became Abbeville County He was most likely the son of Job Smith, Sr. born ca. 1720 who appears to have died in Pendleton district on his lands on 23 Mile Creek between 1790 and 1800.

Sources: Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy, Vol. 1
Pension papers of Rebecca Lindley Smith
Will of Thomas Lindley (father of James), abstracts in NC Wills
Will of Thomas Lindley (son of James) , Laurens, SC
US Census Laurens, SC 1840-1850
Will of Colville Abercrombie, Laurens SC
1880 Mortality Schedule of Campbell Co., GA
Ancestors and Descendants. Sarah Nash
Will of William Cox (1767)
Ancestors and descendants of Smiths. Cheek
Joanne Smith Pirkle Wright

Sunday, March 1, 2009

FIRST OF OUR LINE TO COME TO AMERICA




I THOUGHT I WOULD RUN A SERIES OF OUR ANCESTORS FOR YOU TO SEE HOW WE CAME TO BE WHO WE ARE TODAY.

JAMES FATHER OF THOMAS


b. April 16, 1681 d. October 13, 1726 Was born in Ballinclash, Ireland married Eleanor Park, b. Jan 2, 1684 died ???. James was the first Lindley of our family to come to America. He arrived in Pennsylvania on August 3, 1713. He brought with him wife Eleanor and Thomas in the next generation and 4 other children. James Lindley purchased 200 acres of land in New Garden in 1713, and 400 acres in London Grove in 1722. In 1726 he purchased another 600 acres. In the deed it is stated that he was a blacksmith. James and Eleanor had 12 children. A handwritten will is on file in Chester county, PA.

In a Lindley family history (Indian State Library, genealogy division, G p.ff.9292 H131 no. 1) that quotes this source:

"Contrary to family tradition and printed statements that James Lindley went from county Cheshire, England to Ireland, H. G. Murray, Secretary General of the General Society of Mayflower Descendants denies this. His is a genealogical authority and says that the Murray's and the Lindley's intermarried repeatedly in Scotland where they lived before removing to Ireland. Both families, he states, lived in Perthsire, Scotland, and were among those persecuted by the Pretender's supporters. Scottish emigrants to Ireland went largely to Ulster."

From Allen L. Bradfield, posted to Lindley-L list by Barbara Everly "The marriage certificate of James Lindley and Eleanor Parke describes them as: James Lindly of Tinmullen, County Wicklow, cutler, son of James and Alice Lindley and Eleanor Parke of Rathrush (or Rarush), County Carlow. The signatories of the certificate were:

James Lindly Charles Bernard Elizabeth Lackey

Thomas Parke Phillip Bernard Susanna Nicholson

Rachel Weanhouse (?) Mary Bernard Dorothy Lacky

Robert Parke Elizabeth Bernard Abigail Boles

Robert Parke (#2) John Watson Elizabeth Watson

William Parke John Boles Thomas Linely

Thomas Duckett Martha Parke Charles Wilcocks

Joseph Manliffe Edward Cooper Stephen Tomlinson

John Thompson Rebekah Tomlinson John Lackey"

During the 13 years he lived in America, he acquired a large estate and was one of the largest tax payers in Chester County, PA. The inventory of his estate recorded in Chester County, PA lists personal peoperty valued at 1,115 pounds and a plantation of 1,000 acres.

The inventory of his estate was made 10 mo. 23, 1726.

"Purs and apparell £22.12s.; 7 Beds and Furniture thereto belonging ; 1 Chest of Drawers 2 Chests 2 Boxes and 1 Looking glass; 4 Table Cloaths 13 Sheets and 1 Warming pan; 2 Pieces of Stuff and 1 Sett of New Curtains; fflax, 1 hackle, Chains, Salt box, Iron pots & Candle sticks; 2 mens Saddles 2 weomens Sadles 1 Pillion & 2 Bridles; Wool Cards, Sole Leather, Pewter, Brass Tin, & wooden ware; to Baggs, Mault, Indian Corn, Salt, Wheels, & a half Bushell; Irons in Kitchen, Coopers ware & Earthen ware &c; Dressed Skin, Books Iron, Steel 2 whip saws & 1 Cross; Carpenters Tools, Pincers, Hows, Plows, Harrows & Ox Chains; Grinding Stones, Coles, Bells, Shovells, and forks &c; A Cart with the Geers and Chains, hooks, and hors Shoes; Oak Boards, Scantling, 3 Guns & Bullet Moulds; Grubing Axes; Well Chain, Wolf Trap, falling axes &c; Sickles, Scythes and Doe troughs; corn in the Barn, and Corn in the Mill; Corn in the Ground, and Hay in the Meadow, 16 horses, Mares and Colts; 27 Cows, Oxen and Young Cattle; 10 Sheep and Swine; Smiths Tools in the Shop; one Servant Man; 5 Bonds and one Bill; Book Debts; Plantation and Improvements. (Total value £1115. 9s. 8d.). Quoted from Myers’ Immigration of the Irish Quakers.

Myers also says that "A funeral was always an occasion for a great gathering of Friends. Thomas Chalkley notes that in 1725 as many as a thousand persons were present at a funeral. The body was placed in a plain coffin and borne to the meeting-house, where after a short meeting in memory of the deceased, interment was made in the adjoining graveyard. The company then repaired to the house for dinner, which was almost as elaborate a repast as that served at weddings." The funeral expenses shown in the accounts for James Lindley as filed by his executors were £4. 10s, and the coffin £1. 8s which made it almost six pounds, one of the most cost costly funerals in London Grove of the time.

Friday, February 20, 2009

MARY LINDLEY MURRAY DAUGHTER OF THOMAS LINDLEY


Mary Lindley Murray is known for stalling British troops while General Israel Putnam’s American troops escaped undetected.

Mary Lindley Murray’s father Thomas Lindley immigrated to America from Ireland in 1719. Although a blacksmith, he quickly became well associated with many of the most powerful men in Pennsylvania. In a business venture with fellow Quakers, Lindley opened Durham Furnace, which became one of the leading workshops in the country and proved to be quite prosperous. The Lindley family moved to Lancaster County where Thomas Lindley became a Justice of the Peace and served in the Pennsylvania Assembly.

In Lancaster County, Mary Lindley met Robert Murray, a local merchant who lived near the Lindley home. They married in 1744, after he converted from a Presbyterian to the Society of Friends as a Quaker. In 1753, the Murray family moved to New York. Robert quickly became one of the most successful and wealthiest merchants in the city.

Robert Murray was a Loyalist and continued to buy British goods. However, Mary Murray was sympathetic to the Americans. Many members of her family were Revolutionaries and served in Washington's army. Her independent ideology was influenced by her father, an anti-establishment politician. Because of that, her husband was not exiled at the war's end, as was the case for many of those who were loyal to the British government.

Mary Lindley Murray proved to be a true patriot despite her husband’s loyalties to the King. After the British won the Battle of Brooklyn, General George Washington’s troops began to retreat. On September 15, 1776, British troops led by General William Howe landed in Kip’s Bay with intending to trap General Israel Putnam’s retreating troops. Mary Murray knew that Putnam’s troops were within a mile of her Long Island home and that the British troops were almost double those of Putnam’s army. If Murray did not do something to stop the British troops, Putnam would be trapped. Murray stalled the British troops by inviting them in to eat. Murray and her daughters entertained them while they waited for Putnam’s troops to escape. It is rumored that Murray asked her maid to keep watch from an upstairs window and to let her know when the troops had safely withdrawn. Murray successfully kept the British from capturing the American soldiers.

In a journal entry on September 20, 1776, James Thacher, a surgeon with the Continental army, recorded the incident, which is strong evidence of Murray's genuine assistance to the American cause. Some writers have questioned whether Murray truly intended to delay the British or if she was in fact trying to ensure her family’s social position with the Americans, while also appearing to please the British. Throughout the war - especially in places such as New York that were taken and retaken by opposing forces - it made sense to place bets on both sides. The sum of the evidence, however, points to Murray's actions as genuine support of the Revolution.

However, historians feel that Mary Murray’s actions may have been exaggerated. There is some question as to whether Murray intended to delay the troops or if that was just an attempt to ensure her family’s social position with the Patriots while at the same time

Friday, February 13, 2009

LINDLEY FORT


Lindley's Fort
On July 15, 1776, a number of Indians and Tories attacked this frontier fort where area settlers had gathered for protection. Major Jonathan Downs, with a company of men, had arrived the previous evening & helped repulse the attack. This victory gave encouragement to the American cause locally. The site is located about 600 yds. south.
Jonathan Downs
One of the Justices of the Peace to settle a courthouse site for Laurens County, Jonathan Downs was a member of the 1st & 2nd Provincial Congresses and served in the South Carolina General Assembly. His Revolutionary War service included the Laurens County battles of Lindley's Fort (1776), where he was commander, & Hayes' Station (1781). He died in 1818.

Erected 1990 by Laurens County Council and Laurens County Historical Society. (Marker Number 30-8.)

Location. 34° 28.283′ N, 82° 7.097′ W. Marker is in Ware Shoals, South Carolina, in Laurens County. Marker is on Fort Lindley Road, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Laurens SC 29360, United States of America.

Monday, February 9, 2009

THOMAS MARK LINDLEY 1st ALABAMA CAVALRY, USA


Thomas Linley/Lindley
Thomas Linley/Lindley

Age: 29
Birthplace: Walton Co., GA
Rank at enlistment: Private
Rank at discharge: Corporal
Company Assignment: E

10/4/1864 Enlisted
Rome, GA
10/4/1864 Mustered In
Rome, GA
10/20/1864 Promoted
To corporal
3/21/1865 Prisoner of War
Near Faison's Station, NC
6/12/1865 Mustered Out
Camp Chase, OH
Notes:
Thomas Mark Lindley was born November 15, 1834 and moved with his family to Randolph Co., AL in 1848 where he married Rosanne Elizabeth Susan Ball in April 1856. After the war he returned to Randolph Co. and became a preacher. He was the first pastor of Wesly's Chapel Christian Church and Mandy's Chapel Methodist Church. After Elizabeth "Betsy" died January 7, 1906, Thomas married Sarah Smith.

I just came across this two days ago.
I have not been able to contact the guy who furnished the info on Thomas Mark.
I NEVER KNEW THAT HE REMARRIED AFTER ELIZABETH DIED.

RON, JAN FIELDS AND FAMILY CHRISTMAS 2007


RON AND JAN FIELDS




Adults standing left to right. Manuel Gomez, Ronda Gomez, Jerry Lindley, Ronnie Fields, Valerie Jan Fields, Amanda Barbee, Coker Barbee.

Adult Sitting: Elbert Lindley

Children left to right: Sarah Gomez, Carolina Gomez, Brianna Barbee, Cody Barbee, Daren Barbee




Friday, February 6, 2009

LINDLEY BOYS GO TO WAR


THESE WERE FROM THE LOCAL NEWSPAPER

Saturday, January 31, 2009

WAS OUR ANCESTOR THOMAS LINDLEY A PATRIOT OR A LOYALIST?



I HAVE REVIEWED A LOT OF MATERIAL ON THOMAS LINDLEY AND MADE UP MY MIND AS TO WHICH HE WAS!
YOU NEED TO READ THESE FEW STORIES THAT I SELECTED OUT OF ALL THAT I REVIEWED AND MAKE UP YOUR OWN MIND!



Thomas LINDLEY. Born on 25 FEB 1705/06 in Bally Brommell, Carlow, Ireland. Thomas died in Orange County, North Carolina on 14 Sep 1781, he was 76. He is buried in Spring Meeting Burying Grounds. On 21 Nov 1731 when Thomas was 26, he married Ruth HADLEY, daughter of Simon HADLEY, ESQ. & Ruth MILLER, in New Garden, Pennsylvania. Born on 12 Jun 1711 in Moate MM, West Meathe, Ireland. Ruth died in Alamance (then Orange), North Carolina on 12 Apr 1785, she was 73. See the Hadley line. *Thomas Lindley and Ruth Hadley our last Emigrant Ancestors moved their family from London Grove, Pennsylvania, to Cane Creek, Orange County, North Carolina, in the early 1750s.

See a great web site with pictures of the Cane Creek are here.

For more than twenty years, Thomas and Ruth lived on a farm in London Grove Township making their living entirely by farming. In the early Spring of 1753, they sold their farm in London Grove and moved to the Piedmont of central North Carolina. This was an area of rolling hills of mild undulations up to as much as 200 feet of relief above the adjacent lowlands or valleys. There were large stands of oak, hickory, and pine forests. It is probable that the move was made because they wanted land and other economic opportunities for their children. Troubles with the Indians had made the Western frontier of Pennsylvania increasingly dangerous as well.

Thomas received two land grants from the Earl of Granville for a total of 1000 acres. The second land grant was for 600 acres and read "On the South Fork of Cane Creek and West side of Haw River, beginning at a white oak by the creek, then running South 100 chains to a black oak, then West 60 chains to a white oak, then North cross the fork 100 chains to a black jack, then East across the fork to the first station."


HUSBAND
Thomas Lindley—12
Yr of Birth
1706
WIFE
Ruth Hadley-86
Yr of Birth
1712
HUSBAND - Thomas Lindley-12
Abstracts of Wills Recorded in Orange Co. NC by Rugh Herndon Shields, 1958 Reference A 252 Will dated 15 Mar 1780, probated August Court 1782 Wife Ruth Son William Daughter Katherine White Other children: Thomas, Ruth, William, John, Elinor Mauriss, Deborah Newlin. Son Jonathan. Shows he was son of James Lindley. Save to ‘Friends of Spring Meeting 2 acres land whereon meeting house now stands”
Executors William and Jonathan Lindley
Witnesses Zacharia flicks, John Carter, John Newlin
WIFE — Ruth Hadley—86
CHILD 1 — Katherine Lindley—160
Birthdate from Our Lindley Emigrants in NC State Library Ben. Branch
also in Hinshaw Encyclopedia American Ouaker Senealogy V. I p. 358
Katherine was 18 when the family moved to NC
Algie Newlin in ‘Friends at the Spring’ cites her marriage under a
minute from Cane Creek MM, but he believes it could have been the first
wedding in the Spring Meeting House. Date of entry 3rd of 4 mo 1756.
Burial place from Hadley Benealogy by Lyle H. Hadley Nc State Library Sen
Branch.
CHILD 2 - James Lindley-161
Our Lindley Emigrants says James was a twin. The other twin, a brother,
named Simon died in infancy. The next child b 1737 was also named Simon.
Marriage from 202 Early Marriage Abstracts, Orange Co. NC
Wife was probably d/o William and Catharine Cox who came to Cane Creek from
Newark MM Kennett PA 1752
Death date not verified.
James was said to be a Tory.
CHILD 3 — Simon Lindley-162
Our Lindley Emigrants shows birthdate and will dated 10 Jul 1760,
probated 1760.
CHILD 4 - Thomas Lindley-163
CHILD 5 — William Lindley—164
FAMILY BROUP RECORD-35
DOCUMENTAT ION
1/1/1980 Page 3
:
HUSBAND
Thomas Lindley—12
Yr of Birth
1706
WIFE
Ruth Hadley-86
Yr of Birth
1712
HUSBAND - Thomas Lindley-12
Abstracts of Wills Recorded in Orange Co. NC by Rugh Herndon Shields, 1958 Reference A 252 Will dated 15 Mar 1780, probated August Court 1782 Wife Ruth Son William Daughter Katherine White Other children: Thomas, Ruth, William, John, Elinor Mauriss, Deborah Newlin. Son Jonathan. Shows he was son of James Lindley. Save to ‘Friends of Spring Meeting 2 acres land whereon meeting house now stands”
Executors William and Jonathan Lindley
Witnesses Zacharia flicks, John Carter, John Newlin
WIFE — Ruth Hadley—86
CHILD 1 — Katherine Lindley—160
Birthdate from Our Lindley Emigrants in NC State Library Ben. Branch
also in Hinshaw Encyclopedia American Ouaker Senealogy V. I p. 358
Katherine was 18 when the family moved to NC
Algie Newlin in ‘Friends at the Spring’ cites her marriage under a
minute from Cane Creek MM, but he believes it could have been the first
wedding in the Spring Meeting House. Date of entry 3rd of 4 mo 1756.
Burial place from Hadley Benealogy by Lyle H. Hadley Nc State Library Sen
Branch.
CHILD 2 - James Lindley-161
Our Lindley Emigrants says James was a twin. The other twin, a brother,
named Simon died in infancy. The next child b 1737 was also named Simon.
Marriage from 202 Early Marriage Abstracts, Orange Co. NC
Wife was probably d/o William and Catharine Cox who came to Cane Creek from
Newark MM Kennett PA 1752
Death date not verified.
James was said to be a Tory.
CHILD 3 — Simon Lindley-162
Our Lindley Emigrants shows birthdate and will dated 10 Jul 1760,
probated 1760.
CHILD 4 - Thomas Lindley-163
CHILD 5 — William Lindley—164

Our Lindley Emigrants says he was murdered.
Marriage date and place from Hadley Genealogy by Lyle Hadley
Typed copy of his will on file.
CHILD 6 - Ruth Lindley—102
CHILD 7 — John Lindley—165
Birthdate from Bellarts also marriage date.
Deathdate and place from Our Lindley Emigrants.
CHILD B - Elender Lindley—166
Our Lindley Emigrants shows a daughter Mary b 1949 who m George Mans 18 Apr 1770. This child does not appear in Bellarts listing of children or in Hinshaw. I have omitted her here. /
Elender was born shortly before the family left for NC
Piedmont NC Cemeteries V. I p. 5 shows Elenor wife of George
d/o Thomas and Ruth and gives deathdate
CHILD 9 — Deborah Lindley—167
Husband’s will bequeathed to my son Thomas all the land on which I now live on the north side of Cane Creek supposed to contain about three hundred acres to him and his heirs forever.. .on the express conditions that he shall support his mother comfortably...
Deborah went with that son and his family when they went to Lick Creek IN
1824. No record of Deborah’s death, but she does not appear on 1830 census.
CHILD 10 — Jonathan Lindley—168
Birthdate from Bellarts, Facts, Fiction... Deathdate from Heiss, abstracts of Duaker Records in IN Lick Creek
Deed to Spring MM NC 1795 copied Orange Ca. NC 3—30-83
1st wife d/a Zachariah and Ruth Dicks. Buried in 1st marked grave in
Orange Co. IN Lick Creek Cem
‘Friends at the Spring’ by Algie Newlin pps. 62—64 describes Jonathan as a leader of wagon train from Spring NM NC to Lick Creek in IN. Some 21 wagons, 75 Quakers mostly related started from NC April 1811. Certificates to Whitewater, only Quaker meeting at that time in IN, received October 1811.
Hinshaw ‘Carolina Experience’ p. 144 also describes this caravan.




Thomas and Ruth's first 8 children were born in London Grove, PA. The family moved to Orange county N.C. sometime after 1750 where the remaining 2 children were born. Thomas built a gristmill in Alamance county, NC that is still in operation by Henry Lindley and some of his other descendants. He was active in the Revolutionary War, where sadly some of his family fought on opposite sides. He died on the day of the battle of Lindley's Mill. For information on this see "The Battle of Lindley's Mill" by Algie I. Newlin or "Lindley Family Roots in PA, NC, SC, GA, and AL" by Terry M. Lindley. Both of these books may be in your library.
Based on Lindley family information by Clarence Roberson. Founders and Patriots of the Republic of Texas, p. 394-396. Samuel Lindley's grandparents, Thomas and Ruth Hadley Lindley, came from Ireland in about 1710 to 1713 to settle in Chester County, Pa., suggesting the possibility that Robert's ancestors and Samuel's had known each other in Pennsylvania before moving to South Carolina. History of Montgomery County, p. 378.


Thomas was an iron master in Swatra, Pennsylvania and was later a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly from 1739-41. H e received two land grants from the Earl of Granville fo r a total of almost 1000 acres. In 1756 he partnered wit h a neighbor, Hugh Laughlin, to build and operate a grist m ill. This mill is still in the Lindley family. The area ar ound this mill was the center of the Battle of Lindley's M ill September 13, 1781 in the American Revolution. Thomas a nd Ruth gave the land on which Spring Monthly Meeting was f ounded. The building has been rebuilt in 1910, but the cong regation is still in existance. [Sadler.GED]





In the early records of Hillsboro, Orange County, North Carolina is found this agreement: "Hugh Laughlin, planter, on the one part and Thomas Lindley, on the other, have agreed to become partners in joint company to erect and build a water grist mill on Cane Creek, to the south side of Haw River. The water to be taken out of that land owned by Hugh Laughlin and the mill to be built on that part owned by Thomas Lindley, 3 and 3/4 acres, September Court 1755. On September 14, 1781 during the Revolutionary War. A battle was fought at this mill and was referred to as "The Battle of Lindley's Mill"

Thomas Lindley was our Revolutionary ancestor who assisted in establishing American Independence while acting in the capacity of giving aid to the Army as a Patriot. The Will of Thomas Lindley is recorded in Book A, page 252, in the office of Clerk of Courts, Hillsboro, Orange County, North Carolina, dated March 15, 1780.

Thomas and Ruth were the parents of 12 children. Their youngest, Jonathon, was a member of the State Legislature and the National Convention. He also was the leader of the first anti-slavery group of Quakers that left Cane Creek in 1811 and went to Indiana. Thomas and Ruth also gave the land on which the Spring Monthly Meting was founded. The first meetinghouse may have been started in the 1770s. This Quaker meetinghouse is still in existence today in a building that was rebuilt in 1910. Thomas, who died on September 14, 1781, the day after the Battle of Lindley's Mill, is buried in the Spring Friends Cemetery immediately across the road from the meetinghouse. Ruth, who died December 4, 1785, is also buried there. In 1928, a large granite memorial was placed in the cemetery to honor Thomas and Ruth.
Thomas was an iron master in Swatra, Pennsylvania and was later a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly from 1739-41. H e received two land grants from the Earl of Granville for a total of almost 1000 acres. In 1756 he partnered with a neighbor, Hugh Laughlin, to build and operate a grist mill. This mill is still in the Lindley family. The area around this mill was the center of the Battle of Lindley's Mill September 13, 1781 in the American Revolution. Thomas and Ruth gave the land on which Spring Monthly Meeting was founded. The building has been rebuilt in 1910, but the congregation is still in existance. [Sadler.GED]

Thomas was born in Balinclash, Ireland and married Ruth Hadley. Both are buried at the Spring Meeting cemetery in Alamance County, North Carolina. Thomas and Ruth's first 8 ch ildren were born in London Grove, PA. The family moved t o Orange County, North Carolina sometime after 1750 where the remaining 2 children were born. Thomas built a grist mill in Alamance County, North Carolina that is still in operation by some of his descendants. He was active in the Revolutionary War, where sadly some of his family fought on opposite sides. He died on the day of the Battle of Lindley' s Mill. For information on this see "The Battle of Lindley 's Mill" by Algie I. Newlin or "Lindley Family Roots in PA , NC, SC, GA, and AL" by Terry M. Lindley. Both of these books may be in your Library.

Thomas Lindley and Hugh Laughlin built a grist mill and went into a partnership. The water coming from Laughlin's land and the mill on Lindley's land. Records show that this was the first mill in the area and was built in 1756 on the banks of Cane Creek. This is present day Alamance County , North Carolina and is a bit north of Siler City, North Carolina. The mill still stands today, and is operated by Henry Lindley, a descendent. This is where the battle of Lindley's Mill was fought. The Tories badly outnumbered the Whigs and as a result "won" the battle.

Thomas Lindley who lived in Alamance County, North Carolina , was a loyalist or a Tory. It is not known if he was an active participant in the Battle of Lindley's Mill or not . The Battle of Lindley's Mill occurred on September 14,
1781. Thomas Lindley died on that day.

The battle was sparked by the action of the Tories who captured Governor Burke the day before the battle. He was governor of North Carolina at the time. They also captured thirteen high ranking Whig officials, all of which they intended to turn over to British authorities at Wilmington, North Carolina. The Tories did turn them over after the battle.

This was a dreadful day for Thomas Lindley as well as all families involved in the battle. Tragically, several families, including the Lindley family were split on which side to fight on. As a result of this, it pitted father against son, and brother against brother. Thomas Lindley was 75 years of age at this time and it is believed that he died this day as a result of a heart attack or stroke, after seeing his family fighting among each other. After the battle the women tended to the wounded at Thomas Lindley's home as well as many others in the area, Tory or Whig, it did not matter.

Thomas had a son and grandson to serve in the Revolutionary War as Captains, serving under Colonel David Fanning on the Tory side.




Thomas Lindley, Patriot
Thomas Lindley b. 25 Feb. 1706, d. 14 Sept. 1781
In discussing the patriotism of Thomas Lindley we should first understand the state of
mind Thomas carried with him during the time leading up to the Revolutionary War.
Thomas lived the first 47 years of his life in New Garden, Pennsylvania. Thomas was a
Quaker and as such could have been a bystander in politics. Thomas was never a
bystander as were most other Quakers at that time. Thomas moved to Cane Creek,
Orange County, North Carolina in 1753 and purchased two parcels of land from the
Grandville District.[I] Thomas and his neighbor Hugh Laughlin formed a partnership and
built a gristmill that will be of interest later in the sketch.[II] Thomas became involved the
Regulator movement at least as soon as 11 May 1768. Thomas volunteered his home for
a meeting of the Regulators on that date.[III] The Regulators were an organization formed
to oppose excessive tariffs and taxes imposed by the British prior to and leading up to the
coming conflict. The most odious of taxes at the time was the Stamp Act. Thomas
Lindley opposed the Stamp Act and is listed in the Regulators of North Carolina.[IV] With
the Johnston Riot of 1771 the Regulator movement basically came to an end. The
existing Regulators that were not involved in the leadership positions of the movement
were given amnesty if they would swear allegiance under oath to support the crown.[V]
Thomas was not listed as having done this for two reasons. One reason is that Quakers
would only give oath to their God. The British governor Tryon made an allowance for
this fact and the Quakers were given the choice of “affirming” allegiance. Thomas did
not do an affirmation either, but he chose silence.[VI]
Moving to the Revolutionary War era we will see Thomas engaged in the rearing of his
family and the operation of the Mill. September 14, 1781 dawned as a very bad day in
Thomas Lindley’s life. His son, James (b. 22 Sept. 1735, d. 14 Feb. 1779), had been a
Tory officer hanged by the Whigs after losing the Battle of Kettle Creek in Wilkes
County, Georgia in 1779, leaving a wife and children. His other son, John and nephew
William, were officers riding with Colonel John Pyle MD, a noted Tory in Orange,
County.[VII] His son Jonathan was supporting the Whigs. Thomas had to be wondering
where he went wrong. After all, aren’t Quakers supposed to be pacifists?
Several more interesting items were going to occur on this day. The Tory forces under the
command of Edmund Fanning, a brutal Tory leader, were marching toward the Lindley
plantation. All the neighbors, Thomas Lindley included, knew the reputation of Fanning.
The Whig forces, under the command of John Butler, were marching to meet them to
rescue the prisoners Fanning held, which included the Governor of the province. For a
full synopsis of the battle see “The Battle of Lindley’s Mill”. [VIII]
How do we prove the patriotism of Thomas Lindley? We have the Revolutionary War
Accounts record listing a man named Thomas Lindley as having provided 11 pounds
sterling of a product to the Revolutionary Army.[IX] We have the actual receipt for 11
pounds sterling specie (silver coin) signed by a Thomas Lindley and the date is 1784.
Thomas Lindley died, however, on that bad day in September 14, 1781.[X] What
happened?

Let’s take this one step at a time. Several items will be of interest in proving Thomas
Lindley Sr. provided the product to the Revolutionary Army.
1. The Revolutionary Army was not in that area of North Carolina in 1784.
2. Thomas Lindley Jr. did not own a mill and was not awarded the mill in the will of
Thomas Lindley Sr. Who signed the receipt?
3. The will of Thomas was probated in October 1782.
4. The payment of 11 pounds was in specie and not in North Carolina script, which
was in use in 1784. This implies an earlier debt than 1784.
5. The Revolutionary War debt was paid long after the debts were incurred. Soldiers
were paid as late as 1792 in some cases.
6. Several references to 39 barrels of flour are extant, for Thomas Sr. delivering on
14 Sept. 1781 that fateful day, by other researchers.
7. A discussion of the graft and corruption in the Revolutionary War Army Accounts
system and conclusion.
1. The Revolutionary Army left this area of North Carolina after the Battle of
Lindley’s Mill. After the Battle of Guilford Courthouse March 15, 1781, General Greene,
technically the loser of the battle, marched his men to Charleston, South Carolina and
basically ignored Cornwallis. Cornwallis stayed in North Carolina for a time and
ultimately moved his army north to the Dan River in Virginia. Cornwallis then moved on
to Yorktown and his surrender occurred 19 October 1781 in the siege of Yorktown.[XI]
The remaining Whig forces under General Butler fought the Battle of Lindley’s Mill in
September and, although another Whig loss, inflicted heavy losses on Fanning. The
Tories and Whigs alike removed to the Wilmington area, the Tories leading and the
Whigs in pursuit.[XII] Thomas Lindley would have had to sell the product prior to 1781 or
at least prior to his will being probated in 1782 as the Revolutionary Army was gone
from this area of North Carolina in 1784.
2. Some concern exists about which Thomas Lindley signed the receipt for goods
delivered. There were five Thomas Lindleys in the area in 1781. Thomas Lindley Sr.,
his son Thomas Lindley Jr., and three grandsons of Thomas Lindley Sr. The grandsons
were minors at the time so they could not have signed the receipt. We must be concerned
with Thomas Jr. The will of Thomas Sr. leaves the land that includes Thomas Sr.’s share
of the mill to William and Jonathan.[XIII]Why is this a problem? Thomas had to provide
some sort of foodstuff to the Army. If Thomas Jr. did not own a mill, providing the large
amount of 11 pounds sterling product would be difficult. When large amounts of money
are involved, or for convenience sake, other concerned people will and do sign for their
deceased kindred. We do not know when the product was delivered. We do know when
the receipt was signed for 11 pounds and that was definitely after Thomas Sr. death. The
receipt was obviously signed for him by someone else. If the product were flour from the
mill as I suspect then Hugh Laughlin would be half owner of the product. In any case we
must doubt Thomas Lindley Jr. provided the product to the Army. Common sense says it
came from the mill of Thomas Lindley Sr. The only other Thomas Lindley to own the
Lindley mill was the son of William Lindley. He purchased the mill in 1796 from the
estate of Hugh Laughlin giving him full ownership in both shares of the partnership.[XIV] Let’s take this one step at a time. Several items will be of interest in proving Thomas
Lindley Sr. provided the product to the Revolutionary Army.
1. The Revolutionary Army was not in that area of North Carolina in 1784.
2. Thomas Lindley Jr. did not own a mill and was not awarded the mill in the will of
Thomas Lindley Sr. Who signed the receipt?
3. The will of Thomas was probated in October 1782.
4. The payment of 11 pounds was in specie and not in North Carolina script, which
was in use in 1784. This implies an earlier debt than 1784.
5. The Revolutionary War debt was paid long after the debts were incurred. Soldiers
were paid as late as 1792 in some cases.
6. Several references to 39 barrels of flour are extant, for Thomas Sr. delivering on
14 Sept. 1781 that fateful day, by other researchers.
7. A discussion of the graft and corruption in the Revolutionary War Army Accounts
system and conclusion.
1. The Revolutionary Army left this area of North Carolina after the Battle of
Lindley’s Mill. After the Battle of Guilford Courthouse March 15, 1781, General Greene,
technically the loser of the battle, marched his men to Charleston, South Carolina and
basically ignored Cornwallis. Cornwallis stayed in North Carolina for a time and
ultimately moved his army north to the Dan River in Virginia. Cornwallis then moved on
to Yorktown and his surrender occurred 19 October 1781 in the siege of Yorktown.[XI]
The remaining Whig forces under General Butler fought the Battle of Lindley’s Mill in
September and, although another Whig loss, inflicted heavy losses on Fanning. The
Tories and Whigs alike removed to the Wilmington area, the Tories leading and the
Whigs in pursuit.[XII] Thomas Lindley would have had to sell the product prior to 1781 or
at least prior to his will being probated in 1782 as the Revolutionary Army was gone
from this area of North Carolina in 1784.
2. Some concern exists about which Thomas Lindley signed the receipt for goods
delivered. There were five Thomas Lindleys in the area in 1781. Thomas Lindley Sr.,
his son Thomas Lindley Jr., and three grandsons of Thomas Lindley Sr. The grandsons
were minors at the time so they could not have signed the receipt. We must be concerned
with Thomas Jr. The will of Thomas Sr. leaves the land that includes Thomas Sr.’s share
of the mill to William and Jonathan.[XIII]Why is this a problem? Thomas had to provide
some sort of foodstuff to the Army. If Thomas Jr. did not own a mill, providing the large
amount of 11 pounds sterling product would be difficult. When large amounts of money
are involved, or for convenience sake, other concerned people will and do sign for their
deceased kindred. We do not know when the product was delivered. We do know when
the receipt was signed for 11 pounds and that was definitely after Thomas Sr. death. The
receipt was obviously signed for him by someone else. If the product were flour from the
mill as I suspect then Hugh Laughlin would be half owner of the product. In any case we
must doubt Thomas Lindley Jr. provided the product to the Army. Common sense says it
came from the mill of Thomas Lindley Sr. The only other Thomas Lindley to own the
Lindley mill was the son of William Lindley. He purchased the mill in 1796 from the
estate of Hugh Laughlin giving him full ownership in both shares of the partnership.[XIV] Let’s take this one step at a time. Several items will be of interest in proving Thomas
Lindley Sr. provided the product to the Revolutionary Army.
1. The Revolutionary Army was not in that area of North Carolina in 1784.
2. Thomas Lindley Jr. did not own a mill and was not awarded the mill in the will of
Thomas Lindley Sr. Who signed the receipt?
3. The will of Thomas was probated in October 1782.
4. The payment of 11 pounds was in specie and not in North Carolina script, which
was in use in 1784. This implies an earlier debt than 1784.
5. The Revolutionary War debt was paid long after the debts were incurred. Soldiers
were paid as late as 1792 in some cases.
6. Several references to 39 barrels of flour are extant, for Thomas Sr. delivering on
14 Sept. 1781 that fateful day, by other researchers.
7. A discussion of the graft and corruption in the Revolutionary War Army Accounts
system and conclusion.
1. The Revolutionary Army left this area of North Carolina after the Battle of
Lindley’s Mill. After the Battle of Guilford Courthouse March 15, 1781, General Greene,
technically the loser of the battle, marched his men to Charleston, South Carolina and
basically ignored Cornwallis. Cornwallis stayed in North Carolina for a time and
ultimately moved his army north to the Dan River in Virginia. Cornwallis then moved on
to Yorktown and his surrender occurred 19 October 1781 in the siege of Yorktown.[XI]
The remaining Whig forces under General Butler fought the Battle of Lindley’s Mill in
September and, although another Whig loss, inflicted heavy losses on Fanning. The
Tories and Whigs alike removed to the Wilmington area, the Tories leading and the
Whigs in pursuit.[XII] Thomas Lindley would have had to sell the product prior to 1781 or
at least prior to his will being probated in 1782 as the Revolutionary Army was gone
from this area of North Carolina in 1784.
2. Some concern exists about which Thomas Lindley signed the receipt for goods
delivered. There were five Thomas Lindleys in the area in 1781. Thomas Lindley Sr.,
his son Thomas Lindley Jr., and three grandsons of Thomas Lindley Sr. The grandsons
were minors at the time so they could not have signed the receipt. We must be concerned
with Thomas Jr. The will of Thomas Sr. leaves the land that includes Thomas Sr.’s share
of the mill to William and Jonathan.[XIII]Why is this a problem? Thomas had to provide
some sort of foodstuff to the Army. If Thomas Jr. did not own a mill, providing the large
amount of 11 pounds sterling product would be difficult. When large amounts of money
are involved, or for convenience sake, other concerned people will and do sign for their
deceased kindred. We do not know when the product was delivered. We do know when
the receipt was signed for 11 pounds and that was definitely after Thomas Sr. death. The
receipt was obviously signed for him by someone else. If the product were flour from the
mill as I suspect then Hugh Laughlin would be half owner of the product. In any case we
must doubt Thomas Lindley Jr. provided the product to the Army. Common sense says it
came from the mill of Thomas Lindley Sr. The only other Thomas Lindley to own the
Lindley mill was the son of William Lindley. He purchased the mill in 1796 from the
estate of Hugh Laughlin giving him full ownership in both shares of the partnership.[XIV]

3. The will of Thomas Lindley Sr. was probated or proved in August of 1782. This
was nearly a year after his death.[XV] The product could have been delivered during the
time between the death and the will being proven. If this is the case Thomas Sr. is still
the provider of the product or, rather, his estate is the provider. It may be noted that the
executors of the estate were William and Jonathan Lindley. Where was Thomas Jr.?
4. The payment was in 11-pound specie.[XVI]Specie means coin, not North Carolina
script. Money was very scarce in coin during this time in North Carolina. We need to
spend some time discussing the financial situation in North Carolina at this time. We
know from Gresham’s Law that bad money drives good money out of circulation. The
State of North Carolina was totally broke in 1780. The issuance of script drove coin out
of circulation and the state had to devise a method to support the troops as the war
resumed in the south in 1780. The continued issuance of North Carolina script drove the
inflation rate for necessities to a prohibitive level. The state devised a method to raise
foodstuffs and necessities for the army. This was started in 1780 and continued though
1782. The system was to loan and tax in “kind”. That is, by requesting foodstuffs and
products from the populace which were stored in warehouses and distributed to the troops
as needed. This system continued from 1780 through 1782. The goods requested were:
Indian corn, wheat, rye, oats, rice, pork, and beef. The State of North Carolina made no
attempt to repay these loans until the Federal Government helped in 1784.[XVII] This may
go along way in determining who was owed what, and when, and why was payment so
late.
5. The Revolutionary War debts were paid long after the debts were incurred. Thomas
Lindley’s 11 pounds was recorded in Volume XI of the Revolutionary War Army
Accounts. We know the payment was made in 1784. It is interesting to see the
Revolutionary War Army Accounts Volume X. You will note the payment is made in
1792. This at least shows the relationship of payment to debt occurrence is
irrelevant.[XVIII]
6. Several researchers have quoted 39 barrels of flour being delivered from the
Thomas Lindley mill[XIX]. This is a large amount of flour. Some researchers state the mill
was “drawn on” for 6 loads of flour on the specific date of 14 September 1781[XX]. Drawn
on implies to me a non-voluntary delivery and it may have been just that based on the
paragraph number 4 above. Would this much flour have caused a hardship in the
Lindley/Laughlin mill business? We know there are 220 shillings in 11 pounds. A bushel
of grain costs around 2 shillings a bushel, prior to the runaway inflation of 1780. The
price varied depending on the type of grain. A barrel contains slightly more than 3
bushels. Doing the math, it can be seen that 11 pounds will roughly buy 39 barrels of
flour at 2 shillings per bushel. An acre of good grain land produced about 20 to 25
bushels of grain. Thomas Lindley owned 1000 acres. Not all was under cultivation, but
based on the above yield I doubt if much hardship would have been caused by 39 barrels
of flour. We can see that 11 pounds went a long way in 1780. We can believe the sale
happened, however, since the Whigs were in the area and Quakers would never deny
foodstuffs to any needy person or army.

7. The Revolutionary Army Accounts system was full of graft and corruption. The
receipts were issued at the time of payment of the debts. The debts were not incurred on
the date shown on the receipt for payment. The debts or IOU’s were frequently traded as
money since there was nearly no hard currency in North Carolina during and after the
War. When the debts were to be paid, they were surrendered to the state in Hillsborough
and whoever owned the debt signed the payees name on the back of the receipt. Thomas
Lindley’s signature may have been signed by anyone owning the debt, not necessarily a
family member. [XXI] This can be seen in the Revolutionary War Army Accounts Record.
You will note the receipts are listed at the time of payment and the numbers are not
sequential.[XXII]
In conclusion, I have no trouble placing Thomas Lindley in the patriots’ column.
Thomas Lindley’s history and actions speak loudly of his feelings. The Greensboro
Daily News article, published in 1928, was written after a reunion of Lindley family
members from all over the country. Some of those family members probably knew the
story of Thomas Lindley’s patriotic acts, as they were nearly 100 years closer to the
actual acts that I am today. Neither they nor I saw Thomas put the flour in the wagon,
but the flour was discussed in 1928 or it would not have appeared in the article. Thomas
was also stated to have remained neutral in the referenced article. Thomas may have
thought himself as being neutral, but providing the flour to the Whigs tells a different
story.
James Lindley 2002, Bellevue, Washington7. The Revolutionary Army Accounts system was full of graft and corruption. The
receipts were issued at the time of payment of the debts. The debts were not incurred on
the date shown on the receipt for payment. The debts or IOU’s were frequently traded as
money since there was nearly no hard currency in North Carolina during and after the
War. When the debts were to be paid, they were surrendered to the state in Hillsborough
and whoever owned the debt signed the payees name on the back of the receipt. Thomas
Lindley’s signature may have been signed by anyone owning the debt, not necessarily a
family member. [XXI] This can be seen in the Revolutionary War Army Accounts Record.
You will note the receipts are listed at the time of payment and the numbers are not
sequential.[XXII]
In conclusion, I have no trouble placing Thomas Lindley in the patriots’ column.
Thomas Lindley’s history and actions speak loudly of his feelings. The Greensboro
Daily News article, published in 1928, was written after a reunion of Lindley family
members from all over the country. Some of those family members probably knew the
story of Thomas Lindley’s patriotic acts, as they were nearly 100 years closer to the
actual acts that I am today. Neither they nor I saw Thomas put the flour in the wagon,
but the flour was discussed in 1928 or it would not have appeared in the article. Thomas
was also stated to have remained neutral in the referenced article. Thomas may have
thought himself as being neutral, but providing the flour to the Whigs tells a different
story.
James Lindley 2002, Bellevue, Washington

Thursday, January 29, 2009

SANDERS FAMILY

SOME OF YOU MAY REMEMBER THE POST I MADE ABOUT WESLEY SANDERS. BUT SOME OF THE YOUNGER MAY NOT KNOW THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE SANDERS AND THE LINDLEY'S.
LUTHER LINDLEY MARRIED KATIE CATHERINE SANDERS DAUGHTER OF WESLEY MILLER SANDERS AND ELIZABETH ANN McKEAN. HERE IS A PHOTO OF THEIR FAMILY WITH KATIE CATHERINE AT ABOUT THE AGE OF 12. THE AGE IS JUST A GUESS ON MY PART.



L/R GUS, JIM, WESLEY, ELIZABETH, MOLLY KATIE
IN FRONT LONNIE, ELBERT

Friday, January 23, 2009

DOCUMENTS FROM THE PAST


THIS IS THE ADOPTION OF WILLIAM BY THOMAS MARK . IT IS DATED JUNE 24, 1897.
THAT WOULD MAKE WILLIAM 40 YEARS OLD AT THE TIME. I CALL THIS AN ADOPTION, BUT IT IS REALLY THOMAS MARK RECOGNIZING WILLIAM AS HIS SON FOR THE PURPOSE OF HIM BEING ABLE TO INHERIT FROM THOMAS MARK. HE WAS HIS FATHER, BUT WILLIAM WAS BORN OUT OF WED LOCK




THIS IS THE MARRIAGE RECORD OF LUTHER TO KATIE.IT IS CERTIFIED BY WILLIAM (LUTHER'S FATHER) WHO PERFORMED THE MARRIAGE.


THIS IS LUTHER'S BIRTH CERTIFICATE